Korants run across a field in the village of Zabovci.  Slovene traditional carnival figures called kurenti or koranti, native to northeastern parts of Slovenia, date back centuries and are an important part of Slovene national heritage. Traditionally, korants would visit homesteads in villages. Their arrival would announce the end of the winter and beginning of the new life in springtime as well as bestow good luck on households they visited.
       
     
 Marko Klinc fixes the coat of the korant costume in his workshop in Spuhlja pri Ptuju. Sheep skins are used for the coats and masks and all costumes are hand made to order.
       
     
 Nowadays, korants participate also in large carnival parades. Here, korant masks are stored in the coat-check area of a Carnival hall in Ptuj.
       
     
 Festivities last for days and begin with korantov skok - korant's jump. At midnight korants start to dance, ring their bells and run around a pyre. But they're not allowed to wear the masks yet.
       
     
 Hundreds of korants from all over Slovenia descend on Ptuj for the traditional International Carnival Parade. 
       
     
 Korants jump with a girl during The International Carnival Parade in Ptuj. During the Parade korants continuously choose girls watching the Parade, bring them into the parade and then jump with them. Afterwards girls tie handkerchiefs on their ježevka, a wooden bat with hedgehog spikes that korants used to use as a weapon.   
       
     
 Korants enter Slovene national parliament in the capital Ljubljana. Every year, a group of korants visits the parliament to bring good fortune to politicians and to secure pledges of government support for festivities in the northeast of the country. 
       
     
 Korants chat and flirt with girls in the capital Ljubljana. Every year korants from northeast of the country come to Ljubljana where they visit the national parliament.
       
     
 Korant and devil walk on the road in the village of Zabovci. They had received handkerchiefs at homestead they had already visited.
       
     
 In Haloze, a hilly region in the northeast of Slovenia, korants are accompanied by orači, plowmen, who plow a symbolic furrow in the courtyards of the homes the group visits.
       
     
 Traditionally, only unmarried men were allowed to wear the korant costume. Today, married men, women and also children wear the costumes and participate in festivities.
       
     
 At each homestead korants visit they're offered food and drinks.
       
     
 Group of korants from the village of Zabovci passes a group wearing Donald Duck costumes during fasenk - a village parade where modernity and tradition mix.   
       
     
 Korants rest and take a piss during their visits of homesteads in Zabovci.
       
     
 On the last day of the carnival period, the Carnival mask is burned and buried. After a long day of visiting homesteads, members of The Ethnographic Society Plowers Leskovec gathered at their headquarters, brought a Carnival dummy to the courtyard and set it on fire. The Carnival period was over, spring was around the corner.
       
     
 Korants run across a field in the village of Zabovci.  Slovene traditional carnival figures called kurenti or koranti, native to northeastern parts of Slovenia, date back centuries and are an important part of Slovene national heritage. Traditionally, korants would visit homesteads in villages. Their arrival would announce the end of the winter and beginning of the new life in springtime as well as bestow good luck on households they visited.
       
     

Korants run across a field in the village of Zabovci.

Slovene traditional carnival figures called kurenti or koranti, native to northeastern parts of Slovenia, date back centuries and are an important part of Slovene national heritage. Traditionally, korants would visit homesteads in villages. Their arrival would announce the end of the winter and beginning of the new life in springtime as well as bestow good luck on households they visited.

 Marko Klinc fixes the coat of the korant costume in his workshop in Spuhlja pri Ptuju. Sheep skins are used for the coats and masks and all costumes are hand made to order.
       
     

Marko Klinc fixes the coat of the korant costume in his workshop in Spuhlja pri Ptuju. Sheep skins are used for the coats and masks and all costumes are hand made to order.

 Nowadays, korants participate also in large carnival parades. Here, korant masks are stored in the coat-check area of a Carnival hall in Ptuj.
       
     

Nowadays, korants participate also in large carnival parades. Here, korant masks are stored in the coat-check area of a Carnival hall in Ptuj.

 Festivities last for days and begin with korantov skok - korant's jump. At midnight korants start to dance, ring their bells and run around a pyre. But they're not allowed to wear the masks yet.
       
     

Festivities last for days and begin with korantov skok - korant's jump. At midnight korants start to dance, ring their bells and run around a pyre. But they're not allowed to wear the masks yet.

 Hundreds of korants from all over Slovenia descend on Ptuj for the traditional International Carnival Parade. 
       
     

Hundreds of korants from all over Slovenia descend on Ptuj for the traditional International Carnival Parade. 

 Korants jump with a girl during The International Carnival Parade in Ptuj. During the Parade korants continuously choose girls watching the Parade, bring them into the parade and then jump with them. Afterwards girls tie handkerchiefs on their ježevka, a wooden bat with hedgehog spikes that korants used to use as a weapon.   
       
     

Korants jump with a girl during The International Carnival Parade in Ptuj. During the Parade korants continuously choose girls watching the Parade, bring them into the parade and then jump with them. Afterwards girls tie handkerchiefs on their ježevka, a wooden bat with hedgehog spikes that korants used to use as a weapon.

 

 Korants enter Slovene national parliament in the capital Ljubljana. Every year, a group of korants visits the parliament to bring good fortune to politicians and to secure pledges of government support for festivities in the northeast of the country. 
       
     

Korants enter Slovene national parliament in the capital Ljubljana. Every year, a group of korants visits the parliament to bring good fortune to politicians and to secure pledges of government support for festivities in the northeast of the country. 

 Korants chat and flirt with girls in the capital Ljubljana. Every year korants from northeast of the country come to Ljubljana where they visit the national parliament.
       
     

Korants chat and flirt with girls in the capital Ljubljana. Every year korants from northeast of the country come to Ljubljana where they visit the national parliament.

 Korant and devil walk on the road in the village of Zabovci. They had received handkerchiefs at homestead they had already visited.
       
     

Korant and devil walk on the road in the village of Zabovci. They had received handkerchiefs at homestead they had already visited.

 In Haloze, a hilly region in the northeast of Slovenia, korants are accompanied by orači, plowmen, who plow a symbolic furrow in the courtyards of the homes the group visits.
       
     

In Haloze, a hilly region in the northeast of Slovenia, korants are accompanied by orači, plowmen, who plow a symbolic furrow in the courtyards of the homes the group visits.

 Traditionally, only unmarried men were allowed to wear the korant costume. Today, married men, women and also children wear the costumes and participate in festivities.
       
     

Traditionally, only unmarried men were allowed to wear the korant costume. Today, married men, women and also children wear the costumes and participate in festivities.

 At each homestead korants visit they're offered food and drinks.
       
     

At each homestead korants visit they're offered food and drinks.

 Group of korants from the village of Zabovci passes a group wearing Donald Duck costumes during fasenk - a village parade where modernity and tradition mix.   
       
     

Group of korants from the village of Zabovci passes a group wearing Donald Duck costumes during fasenk - a village parade where modernity and tradition mix.

 

 Korants rest and take a piss during their visits of homesteads in Zabovci.
       
     

Korants rest and take a piss during their visits of homesteads in Zabovci.

 On the last day of the carnival period, the Carnival mask is burned and buried. After a long day of visiting homesteads, members of The Ethnographic Society Plowers Leskovec gathered at their headquarters, brought a Carnival dummy to the courtyard and set it on fire. The Carnival period was over, spring was around the corner.
       
     

On the last day of the carnival period, the Carnival mask is burned and buried. After a long day of visiting homesteads, members of The Ethnographic Society Plowers Leskovec gathered at their headquarters, brought a Carnival dummy to the courtyard and set it on fire. The Carnival period was over, spring was around the corner.